History Curriculum

World History I: Ancient Greece

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

  • Ancient Greek History Course Plan & Tests
  • The Histories
  • The Histories, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The History of the Peloponnesian War
  • History of the Peloponnesian War, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The Persian Expedition
  • The Rise and Fall of Athens: Nine Greek Lives
  • Persian Expedition/Rise and Fall of Athens, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Great Dialogues of Plato**
  • Great Dialogues of Plato, Study Guide (2 book set)**
  • Weekly Quiz Book for Greek History, Study Guide (2 book set)*
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition
  • Classics Conference: The Greek Era  (This flash drive contains the Greek audio files assigned in the course plan.  Optional, unless earning the Honors designation for the course or the Summa diploma.  For students planning on taking both Greek and Roman history, a flash drive with a combined set of the Greek and Roman audio files may be purchased in the bookstore.)**

*Required for Honors

** Used in both 9th Grade History & Literature

Course Description:

This course examines the great civilization of ancient Greece, beginning around 600 B.C. with the rise of the Lydian state, and concentrating on the rise and fall of Athens. The course reads the great ancient histories of the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars. It then examines Plato’s view of the ideal state. Plato’s state can be compared to the actual Greek states and to modern day Republics.The study of ancient Greece is vital to any genuine understanding of the movement and progress of History in the West. The personalities and events from this prominent era in history have largely influenced those of later times.This course will enable the student to observe the timelessness of human relations and the similarities of man’s responses to the conditions in which he finds himself, across time periods; discover the similarities of and difference between ancient Greek and Christian ideas of virtue; trace the cause and effect of political developments in the ancient world and, by extension, in the modern; identify the periods of ancient history and major characters of the period; become familiar with the map of the ancient world and the seeds of modern conflicts; and relate modern historical situations and documents to their ancient antecedents.

World History II: Ancient Rome

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

  • Ancient Roman History Course Plan & Tests
  • The Early History of Rome
  • Early History of Rome, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The War with Hannibal
  • War with Hannibal, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The Annals of Imperial Rome
  • Annals of Imperial Rome, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • City of God
  • St. Augustine, Study Guide (2 book set)*
  • Makers of Rome*
  • Plutarch‘s Roman Lives, Study Guide (2 book set)*
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition
  • Classics Conference: The Roman Era  (This flash drive contains the Roman audio files assigned in the course plan. Optional, unless earning the Honors designation for the course or the Summa diploma. For students planning on taking both Greek and Roman history, a flash drive with a combined set of the Greek and Roman audio files may be purchased in the bookstore.)*

*Used in both 10th Grade History and Literature

Course Description:

This course examines the pre-Christian and early Christian world as seen through the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. It covers highlights of Roman history from the mythical founding of the city in 753 BC, the fall of the Republic in the first century BC, to the fall of the Empire in 476 AD. St. Augustine provides background on the conflict of Catholicism with paganism in Roman society.

The study of ancient Rome is vital to any genuine understanding of the movement and progress of History in the West. The personalities and events from this prominent era in history have largely influenced those of later times.

This course will enable the student to Become familiar with the political and religious developments of this period; know and understand the significance of the important events, dates, persons and places in the Western Europe of 753 BC-476 AD; trace the cause and effect of political developments in the ancient world and, by extension, in the modern; observe the timelessness of human relations and the similarities of man’s responses to the conditions in which he finds himself, across time periods; identify the periods of ancient history and major characters of the period; and become familiar with the map of the ancient world and the seeds of modern conflicts

World History III: The Era of Christendom

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

  • The Era Of Christendom Reader
  • Byzantium
  • Viking Portable Medieval Reader
  • Chronicles
  • Era of Christendom Vol. I, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Era of Christendom Vol. II, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Era of Christendom Vol. III, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Era of Christendom Vol. IV, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to the post-Pagan Roman world (which encompassed the province of Britannia, in the west, to the Kingdoms of Armenia and Georgia in the east), and to the expansion and transformation of that world, i.e. the new lands won for Christ by missionaries and the renewal or abolition of many western and central European institutions and traditions. More than this, the Kolbe 11th grade History Course is an attempt to present as an elaborate thriving organism, an often slandered or overlooked period in which the Christian ideal shaped and inspired the social and political order.

Students will study this era through its sources, occasionally comparing them against the judgments of modern historians, in order to form an impression that is marred neither by the pejoratives of progressives nor the sense of vindication often voiced by Catholics. Students will be able to identify the greater themes of this era and to distinguish between the vagaries of life in this (or any) era, the anomalies of this era, and its ideals. An over-emphasis on particulars—a trick of progressive and anti-Catholic historians—is misleading. Similarly, the person who passes judgment on this era with reference to only the political formulations issued by popes and the recorded aspirations saints will have obscured or overlooked a very complex culture. In short, our goal is to let this era manifest itself to the student, while supplying occasional readings or glosses that put the readings in proper context.

For this very reason the Kolbe 11th Grade curriculum is entitled “the Era of Christendom”, rather than the “Middle Ages Curriculum” or “Dark Ages Curriculum”, for the designations “medieval”, “Middle ages” and “Dark Ages” are shamefully derogatory and unscientific, as the historian Theodor Ernst Mommsen observed. We feel it is important therefore that even something so seemingly insignificant as the title of the course suggest a fresh approach to this subject.

United States and Modern History

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

  • Modern History Reader
  • A Documentary History of the United States
  • The Federalist Papers
  • Democracy in America
  • Modern Times
  • Modern History Vol. I, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Modern History Vol. II, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Modern History Vol. III, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Modern History Vol. IV, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

Thought shapes history. Man’s thoughts are shaped by his beliefs, his habits (be they virtue or vice), his society, culture, custom, environment, experience, and education. Man shapes history through his choices, which are rooted in those soils of his thought. As you read the pages of modern history you will see that man’s thought—beliefs and philosophies—are some of the most powerful forces on earth.

This course studies the major ideological trends of modern Western Civilization and their effects on the world. In this course students will be asked to examine the work of a number of thinkers—philosophers, scientists and theologians — in conjunction with their study of historical events and documents. In essence this is both a course in history and in political philosophy. It will be most fruitful to seriously consider the power of an idea to shape history.

Ancient Western Civilization

Honors Designation Available

Course Texts:

  • Ancient Western Civilization Course Plan & Tests
  • The Histories
  • The Histories, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The History of the Peloponnesian War
  • History of the Peloponnesian War, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Makers of Rome*
  • Plutarch’s Roman Lives, Study Guide (2 book set)*
  • The Early History of Rome
  • Early History of Rome, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The War with Hannibal
  • War with Hannibal, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • The Annals of Imperial Rome
  • Annals of Imperial Rome, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • Weekly Quiz Book for Greek History, Study Guide (2 book set)
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition
  • Christ the King, Lord of History (optional)
  • Classics Conference: The Complete Set  (This flash drive contains both the Greek and Roman audio files assigned in the course plan.  Optional, unless earning the Honors designation for the course or the Summa diploma.  The Greek and Roman sets may also be purchased separately.)

*Used in both 10th Grade History and Literature

Course Description:

This course examines the great civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome.  The first half traces the arc of Greek democracy and culture through the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars; the second picks up with the rise and fall of Roman power, from the mythic and historical accounts of Rome’s early days all the way to St. Augustine’s reflections in The City of God on Rome’s fall and the conflict between Christians and pagans in Roman society.

The influence of the personalities, events, and ideas of this era is difficult to overstate, and the study of ancient Greece and Rome is vital to any genuine understanding of the movement and progress of History in the West.  This course will enable the student to:

  • Observe the timelessness of human relations & the similarities of man’s responses to the conditions in which he finds himself across time periods
  • Discover the similarities & differences between ancient Greek & Christian ideas of virtue
  • Trace the cause & effect of political developments in the ancient world &, by extension, the modern world
  • Identify the periods of ancient history & major characters of the period
  • Become familiar with the geography of the ancient world & the seeds of modern geopolitical conflicts
  • Relate modern historical situations & documents to their ancient antecedents

Western Civilization I

Course Texts:

  • Light to the Nations, Vol. I, Textbook
  • Light to the Nations, Vol. I, Teacher Manual
  • Light to the Nations, Vol. I, Workbook CD w/answer key for workbook, chapter quizzes, & tests, Optional but strongly recommended
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

From the coming of Jesus Christ, through the achievements of medieval Christendom, to the threshold of the Enlightenment projects of the 18th century, God’s work in history reveals itself. This book combines narrative accounts with the necessary facts, dates, short biographies, and concept definitions needed for a Christian cultural understanding. The central concern of the volume is the effect on human civilization wrought by the Christian Faith. Drawing on the work of Catholic historians of the 20th century- Christopher Dawson, Hilaire Belloc, and Frederick Wilhelmsen- the authors have crafted a Catholic and accurate account of our Western heritage to convey our story to youth.

Western Civilization II

Course Texts:

  • Western Civilization II Course Plan & Tests
  • Light to the Nations: Part 2, Textbook
  • Light to the Nations: Part 2, Teacher Manual
  • Light to the Nations: Part 2, Workbook CD w/answer key for workbook, chapter quizzes, & tests  (Optional but strongly recommended)
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

This volume presents the history of the modern era in story form, giving proper emphasis to dates, central characters, and key concepts in each era. End of chapter reviews and other material highlight dates and events, characters in history, and definitions of key terms. The central consideration of this volume is how modern ideas, institutions, and culture have developed from the high centuries of Christian culture. Drawing on the guidance of Catholic thinkers and the popes (particularly Leo XIII, Pius XI, Pius XII, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI), this history presents the hope that Christian thought and work hold for the future.

American Civilization

Course Texts:

  • Lands of Hope and Promise, Student Text by Catholic Textbook Project
  • Lands of Hope and Promise, Teacher Manual
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

This course presents the history of North America, including the lands of Mexico, from the landing of Columbus in 1492 to the late 20th century, including the contributions of the Catholic Church, Catholic communities and individuals, and Catholic ideas to the rich and tempestuous American story.

United States Government

(One Semester Only)

Course Texts:

  • Declaration Statesmanship, 3 Book Set
  • MLA Handbook Eighth Edition

Course Description:

This course examines the character and history of American democracy in light of the principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence. It highlights three pivotal periods in our nation’s history: our separation from Britain and the establishment of the Constitution; the sectional conflict over slavery that culminated in civil war; and the struggle for racial equality in the 20th century that eventually saw a triumph of Declaration principles over unjust laws. Throughout the course, the influence of philosophy and religion on the evolution of American thought is emphasized. The course ends with a meditation on the dangers that threaten our democracy today.

 

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